Purchasing New Stock in Spring

Thanks to sales we have some cash in the portfolio and we will be looking at additional stock purchases in the spring.

– Portfolio 1 – one stock
– Portfolio 2 – one stock
– Portfolio 3 – two stocks
– Portfolio 4 – no stocks
– Portfolio 5 – one stock
– Portfolio 6 – no stocks

We will also look to see if we should put stop losses on any of the stocks. All of the prior stop losses have expired (they are only good a certain amount of days under the brokerage system that we use).

Stop Orders Entered

After the recent analysis, the following stop orders have been entered.

Each of these stop loss orders is good until 2/20/15 (60 days from now).

Portfolio One

Sasol – SSL at 35 (now at $38.95) SOLD AT $35

Transalta – TAC at 8 (now at $9.18)

Portfolio Two

Anadarko – APC at $75 (now at $84.86) SOLD AT $74.97

Transalta – TAC at 8 (now at $9.18)

Portfolio Three

Anadarko – APC at $75 (now at $84.86) SOLD AT $74.97

Weibo – WB at $13 (at $15.78) SOLD AT $13.06

Portfolio Four

Coca Cola Femsa – KOF at $80 (now at $89.14)

Seaspan – SSW at $17 (now at $18.80)

Portfolio Five

Sasol – SSL at $35 (now at $38.95) SOLD AT $35

Seaspan – SSW at $17 (now at $18.80)

Portfolio Six

Coca Cola Femsa – KOF at $80 (now at $89.14)

Seaspan – SSW at $17 (now at $18.80)

New Stop Loss Orders

Our stop loss orders have expired.   I went through the stocks and picked out a few more per portfolio.  These expire in 60 days (6/3/14) or if they are executed.

Portfolio One

Twitter (TWTR) is at $44.  Put in a limit at $35.  The stock has dropped since we purchased it and is very volatile.  Twitter got dumped on by the market and fell quickly, hit limit and we sold

Portfolio Two

Splunk (SPLK) limit at $60.  This stock has been a great portfolio but don’t want to ride it too far down.  Hit limit and sold off.  Note the stock has continued to fall far below this number, into the 40’s. Glad we sold.  At some point may look to get back in the stock

– Facebook (FB) limit at $50.  Same as Splunk.

Portfolio Three

– Splunk (SPLK) limit at $50 per above.  Hit limit and sold off

– Baidu (BIDU) limit at $140, has been down since we’ve bought it

Portfolio Four

– Nucor (NUE) limit at $46

– Seaspan (SSW) limit at $18

Portfolio Five

– Seaspan (SSW) limit at $18

– Baidu (BIDU) limit at $140, has been down since we’ve bought it

Portfolio Three

– Seaspan (SSW) limit at $18

– Baidu (BIDU) limit at $140, has been down since we’ve bought it

 

 

Stock Market Performance and Our Stocks in the News

Over the 11+ years that we’ve been setting up these trust funds, tools for monitoring stock performance have improved greatly.  Today I use Google Finance to keep portfolios online for each of the six trust funds, and I update them for buys and sells and available cash.  When we first started these portfolios, it was the dawn of the Internet age (remember those commercials for e-trade), and we usually waited to receive our paper statements.

On the other hand, you don’t want to move into a mode of constant reshuffling of the portfolios.  Watching frequently is strongly correlated with frequent trading – you see and react to short term market movements, and you “kick yourself” when you don’t act on short term hunches.

For these portfolios there is a secondary consideration that I want the portfolio beneficiaries, who will ultimately receive 100% of the value of these stocks, to be as large a part of the decision making process on purchases and sales as possible.  This is a key purpose of these trust funds – to teach the beneficiaries about money and to show the real and substantial long term gains that can occur from systematic investing in a thoughtful way over a long period of time.  For purchases we are able to accomplish this by making it an annual process, tied with the annual back-to-school ritual.  For sales, I am attempting to make this more of a joint decision making process by setting “stop loss” levels up front and communicating these levels rather than selling when I think something is 1) overvalued 2) headed for a big loss.  I still have to move unilaterally on an occasional sale when I want to move relatively quickly, however, but I try to minimize those activities.

With all this said, I do watch the markets relatively closely (usually for a few minutes each night I scan the google finance portfolios for the six trust funds and see if alerts pop up for any of the stocks).

While it is easy to say that “the market has rallied this year and gone up by x%” and then to compare this return vs. your stocks, in reality every stock has its own story based on nationality (about 1/2 of our stocks are non-US), its industry, and then finally there is the large “joint” component of economic moves by the Federal Reserve starting with ZIRP and then moving into “Quantitative Easing”.  These events greatly influence all stock pricing, which can be seen clearly when the entire portfolio moves up and down in unison based on news (or perceived consensus on behavior) from the Feds.

Another entire path is how the international markets are faring – the Chinese economy is built on capital expansion, both in real estate and in manufacturing, and they have their own version of high leverage in various trust products and local debt and banking relationships that are starting to flash major warning signals.  When you listen to the news on economics 90% of it is about the US and our policies, when we represent maybe 20% of the world wide economy and we are heavily influenced by what happens elsewhere.  Of high interest to stock investors is the fact that Chinese markets have been in a slump for years, as they anticipated high growth before the growth became reality and then Chinese investors have since moved on to the (perceived) “easier gains” of local real estate.

Thus with all of this background behind us, here are some of the stories that I’m watching…

Australian banks seem to be the most expensive in the world, and are booming due to a real estate and highly valued currency.  We own Westpac, and this is something to watch.  Note also that when evaluating a high dividend stock (they currently yield almost 6%), it is important to look beyond just the stock value to see the total return.

Yahoo! is a 2013 pick and has done very well recently, up over 40% since we selected it in late Q3 2013.  The new CEO (Marissa Mayer) recently fired her hand-picked head of advertising who had a $60M pay package and their advertising revenue isn’t growing.  However, this doesn’t matter much since almost all of the value of this stock is in its China (Alibaba) stake and Japan stake – the US operations are mostly irrelevant (or a possible upside) to the stocks’ total valuation, per this article.

Shell (we own the “B” shares because they are out of the UK and don’t have the dividend withholding that we would have if we owned the “A” shares out of the Netherlands) recently issued earnings guidance that was touted as “Shell shock” about bad quarterly results.  The stock went down and now we are watching to see what happens next.

Beyond Shell we have a large exposure to the oil industry, including Statoil (Norway), SASOL (South Africa), CNOOC in China (we sold CEO recently when it hit our stop loss), Exxon, and also Anadarko (natural gas).  Thus we need to monitor these companies, to some extent, but we mainly buy and hold them because this is an essential part of the world economy and they pay strong dividends (mostly).

We continue to monitor these stocks and will close down our stop-losses pretty soon and create new stop-losses going out into 2014 for a few months.  We want to keep some down side coverage going both for stocks that have had a great run but also for stocks that might be headed for a fall.  Our stop loss strategy is summarized in this post.

New Stop Loss Orders Entered

Back in October we set up some stop-loss orders.  None of these orders were executed because the market has been up since then (for my stocks, at least).  Since the orders didn’t occur they were free to set up and it is free when they expire (or I cancel them).  We did “pull the trigger” on some stocks that have been on watch (Riverbed, Bancolumbia).

Stop loss trades are good for 60 days, and then they expire.  Given that the market has been on a tear, it makes sense to set up some more stop loss trades in case we move into an extended downward phase – I don’t want to watch the run-up and then watch them go back down.

While there isn’t a “rule” on stop losses, I am going to make some now.  In general:

– I don’t want more than 1/3 of a particular portfolio in “stop loss” mode (this may not apply if you have only a few stocks, like 4 or 6).  These are long term investment vehicles, and I don’t want to deal with re-buying an entire portfolio after a 10% small market correction

– If a stock needs to be sold, then sell it, don’t use stop losses as a wimpy sales mechanism.  We did clean up a couple of stocks that were on watch recently

– Remember that while stop loss orders can prevent you from taking a big loss, they also take you “out of the market” if it goes right back up

– Sales near year end will generate gains that may generate additional taxes for the government.  In general these portfolios are not as tax sensitive because they are owned by individuals who don’t pay much in taxes but if we had a big selloff it could cause them to pay some additional amounts to Uncle Sam

– Finally, remember that money sold off needs to be re-invested.  Back in 2007 I sold off some stocks that made big runs, and we did well and many of the stocks haven’t reached their pre-crash peaks.  However, that money has to be re-invested, and often the stock you pick is as over-valued as the one that you are selling.  This isn’t a free lunch…

Portfolio 1 – 20 stocks

  • Urban Outfitters – URBN – at $35 (don’t want to ride this back down)
  • PM – recently dropped from $92 to $85… Stop loss at $80
  • SNP – went from 70 in July to 90 then down to $84.  Stop loss at $78
  • TSM – was down to $12 then up to $20 now at $17.  Stop loss at $15
  • CMCSA – from $37 to $50… a big run… At $44
  • EBAY – big rise and then recently from $58 to $52…  at $47

Portfolio 2 – 18 stocks

  • Urban Outfitters – URBN – at $35 (don’t want to ride this back down)
  • SI – from $82 to $131…  At $123
  • SNP – went from 70 in July to 90 then down to $84.  Stop loss at $78
  • WYNN – from $94 to $164… at $150
  • FB – $20 to $51, now $47… at 43
  • SPLK – $26 to $75, now $72… at $65

Portfolio 3 – 10 stocks

  • Urban Outfitters – URBN – at $35 (don’t want to ride this back down)
  • SI – from $82 to $131…  At $123
  • WYNN – from 94 to 164… at $150
  • SPLK – $26 to $75, now $72… at $65

Portfolio 4 – 10 stocks

  • NUE – from $41 to $55, now $51.  At $46
  • SSW – from $15 to $25, now $21… At $18

Portfolio 5 – 9 stocks

  • SI – from $82 to $131…  At $123
  • SNP – went from 70 in July to 90 then down to $84.  Stop loss at $78
  • SSW – from $15 to $25, now $21… At $18

Portfolio 6 – 4 stocks

  • SSW – from $15 to $25, now $21… At $18

 

Stop Loss Trades Entered

Update – since the market has kept going up, none of these stop / loss orders has been triggered. This is a good thing. We will leave the orders out there and may re-calibrate them based on the new highs. We only put stop losses on stocks where we thought that either they were near a top or a stock that we’ve had a long term issue with and I wasn’t going to sink all the way back down once it had gotten to break even.

The market has been on a nice rally. Some of the stocks that we’ve held on to for years we’ve given up on (Alcoa, and Exelon a while back) while others we are now putting on “watch” and have a “stop loss” price where they will automatically be sold when the market hits a certain price.

In general, these portfolios are managed as if they have a long time horizon. We will stay invested in the stock market over the entire haul. However, we will watch for stocks that have either stagnated for a long time or may be entering a period of secular decline. Finally, some stocks we’ve nurtured back from earlier lows and I won’t be able to take watching them fall back again.

The last time we put this strategy in play was before the stock crash in 2007-8. We did sell some high flying Chinese stocks that never recovered those high prices again. However, you have to re-invest the money so even selling at a high doesn’t mean that you won’t necessarily lose money; it means you took the gain off the table (or avoided the loss) and then started with a NEW stock that was possibly over-valued at the time of your initial purchase. There is no free lunch, and that is why we employ this strategy sparingly.

How a “stop loss” works is that if a stock hits a certain price, a sell order is immediately issued. It doesn’t mean that it will sell exactly at that price (for instance if your stop loss is at $34 then that is when the order is triggered but it could get filled at $33 or any other price in that range depending on how quickly it is moving down). There is a variant with a “limit”, where you stop at $34 but say something like you don’t want it selling below $33. In that case, if the stock plunges on past your stop and the only offers are at $32, nothing at all happens. In my case I went for the simpler “stop loss” order.

These orders are outstanding for 60 days. After that time they expire, unless renewed. The hope is that the stock market continues to rise and we never trigger ANY of these orders. At that point I will review the market again and determine if I want new stop loss orders for these or different stocks and how to proceed next based on conditions and my specific stocks.

Stop Loss Trades Entered

Portfolio 1

URBN 28 shares at $34 good til December 6

Portfolio 2

ORCL 30 shares at $30 good til Dec 6

WYNN 6 shares at $150 good til Dec 6

URBN 23 shares at $34 good til Dec 6

Portfolio 3

WYNN 6 shares at $150 good til Dec 6

URBN 28 shares at $34 good til Dec 6

CLF 44 shares at $17 good til Dec 6 (updated)

Portfolio 4

ORCL 26 shares at $30 good til Dec 6

NUE 14 shares at $45 good til Dec 6

Portfolio 5

RVBD 30 shares at $13 good til Dec 6

No stop loss orders were entered for Portfolio 6